Aces high: Stunning pictures of Red Arrows tearing across the sky pay poignant tribute to daredevils who lost their lives last year

Starburst: Six jets splay out over the sea in one of the stunning photos which have been compiled for 'Red Arrows in Camera', a stunning photographic record of the world of the Reds

Starburst: Six jets splay out over the sea in one of the stunning photos which have been compiled for ‘Red Arrows in Camera’, a stunning photographic record of the world of the Reds

Nothing can beat witnessing the white-knuckle aerobatics of the Red Arrows in person – but these spectacular photographs of them in action might just be the next best thing.

A collection of some of the most impressive shots of the world-famous display team’s manoeuvres has been compiled for a new book being sold in memory of two stunt pilots who were killed in accidents last year.

Flight Lieutenant Jon Egging died when his Hawk aircraft crashed following a display in August, while

Precision: The team is shown flying in tight formation in an image from the book, which will raise money in memory of pilots Flt Lt Jon Egging and Flt Lt Sean Cunningham, who both died last year

Precision: The team is shown flying in tight formation in an image from the book, which will raise money in memory of pilots Flt Lt Jon Egging and Flt Lt Sean Cunningham, who both died last year

fellow ace Flight Lieutenant Sean Cunningham was killed when his ejector seat misfired at an airbase in November.

Now some of the finest work by photographers E.J. van Koningsveld and Keith Wilson will be sold to raise money for the RAF Benevolent Fund, which exists to support air force personnel and their families.

Red Arrows in Camera, an access-all-areas account written by Mr Wilson, marks a triumphant celebration of the Reds after a year in which the two tragedies in quick

Belly up: Two of the famous red-white-and-blue planes soar over a patchwork of fields in inverted position

Belly up: Two of the famous red-white-and-blue planes soar over a patchwork of fields in inverted position

succession shook the squad and its fans.

Flt Lt Egging’s plane went down as the Reds left Bournemouth Air Festival on August 20. His wife Emma was among the horrified crowd who watched as the accident unfolded, with the 33-year-old pilot fighting to stop his aircraft hitting the nearby village of Throop after it went out of control.

He managed to change course and crashed into a field before coming to rest in the River Stour, where he was pronounced dead at the scene.

Red Arrows

the Reds reach dizzying heights over the coastline

Red Arrows

they are seen rocketing straight upwards in another gravity-defying move

Then, less than three months later, tragedy struck again when Flt Lt Cunningham, 35, was ejected from his plane while still on the runway at RAF Scampton, in Lincolnshire. A malfunction saw him thrown up to 200ft in the air before he plummetted to the ground and later died of his injuries.

Before the two men’s deaths, the Red Arrows had not suffered a fatality since 1988.

The book in their memory, which contains more than 300 photographs, gives an insight into the roles of individual team members, as well as the high standards and tight

In the sky with diamonds: The rearmost planes let loose a stream of billowing white across the blue sky

In the sky with diamonds: The rearmost planes let loose a stream of billowing white across the blue sky

schedules that drive them.

It also showcases every aspect of the team at work and off duty, from the pilots and their Hawk aircraft, to the ground crew (the ‘Blues’) and backroom support staff who keep the team flying.

Squadron Leader Ben Murphy, Team Leader and Red 1, 2010/11, said: ‘The stunning photography throughout this book captures the passion and dedication of a team intent on representing the very best of British and being the best aerobatic team in the world.’

On top of the world: The Red Arrows' signature vapour trails stripe the sky over an airfield

On top of the world: The Red Arrows’ signature vapour trails stripe the sky over an airfield

The world famous jet fleet has been wowing crowds around the world for 47 years.

During this period the nine aircraft, which have been maintained by 60 engineers, have performed a staggering 4,410 times across 54 different countries.

In an average display season the Reds will complete almost 100 flying displays and more than 100 flypasts – showcasing some of the RAF’s most skilled pilots.

Red Arrows in Camera by Keith Wilson is available in hardback from MailShop.

Dance of the daredevils: A perfectly choreographed move sees three jets pass in incredibly close proximity as red and blue smoke streaks the air

Dance of the daredevils: A perfectly choreographed move sees three jets pass in incredibly close proximity as red and blue smoke streaks the air

Click here to buy.

Spectacle: A seven-plane formation charges forth, leaving behind the colours of the Union flag

Spectacle: A seven-plane formation charges forth, leaving behind the colours of the Union flag

Ruling the waves: The world-famous display team, pictured in action over the water, was formed 47 years ago

Ruling the waves: The world-famous display team, pictured in action over the water, was formed 47 years ago

Flight Lieutenant Jon Egging, a Red Arrows pilot who died when his plane crashed following an air show near Bournemouth Airport in Dorset on August 20

Flight Lieutenant Jon Egging died when his plane crashed following an air show near Bournemouth Airport, Dorset, on August 20

Flight Lieutenant Sean Cunningham, 35, who was killed after being ejected from his Hawk T1 while on the ground at RAF Scampton in Lincolnshire on November 8.

November 8, Flight Lieutenant Sean Cunningham (right) was killed after being ejected from his Hawk T1 while on the ground at RAF Scampton in Lincolnshire

Sourced by Daily Mail

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